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Sony Bravia KDL-EX703 32in Freeview HD TV

Small screen star?

I'm not entirely sold on the 100Hz motion interpolation technology - an attempt to make the source material's frame rate more closely match the display's refresh rate, in order to ensure smoother animation. It has the annoying habit of ridding the film-like look from TV material played back through either of the EX703's two Scart connectors. Freeview content viewed through the tuner was fine at 100Hz, but some pre-HD but post revamp episodes of Doctor Who looked like they were shot on videotape. Ditto recordings from my Freeview DVR.

Sony Bravia KDL-32EX703

More ports on the left side

It's clearly something to do with the way the Sony handles interlaced material, and you can turn it off. Thankfully, the TV stores separate picture settings - of which 100Hz is part - for each input, so you can disable it for Scart-fed content but leave it on for tuner-received programmes and whatever you have hooked up to the telly's four HDMI ports.

Other feeds include composite-video, component-video and VGA, but I suspect I'll make more use of the USB port into which you can add an optional Wi-Fi adaptor or a Flash drive of, say, Xvid-encoded .AVI files and watch them on the screen, .SRT subtitle files included if appropriate. Connect your camera and you can view JPEG photos you've taken.

Incidentally, the 10W-per-speaker sound isn't bad either. Sure it's not as beefy as the audio experience a big, boxy CRT TV might deliver, and certainly not hi-fi. It also exposes the degree to which different Freeview stations' sound levels vary, even between a single broadcaster's channels. But it's not weedy, either, and fine for all but the most audiophile viewers.

Sony Bravia KDL-32EX703

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