Feeds

Want to escape ACTA? Move to China

Google may have jumped the gun

Boost IT visibility and business value

Google has become the first major tech company to express concern about the Lizard People's ACTA Treaty. This isn't surprising. As the world's de facto governing body for all-matters-internet, Google doesn't like somebody muscling in on its patch. There's only one way to settle this, as Harry Hill might say.

"We're concerned ACTA could rewrite laws that have made the Internet a platform for economic growth, creativity and free expression," the Chocolate Factory said in a statement. It's particularly concerned about the expense of countries implementing a DMCA-style takedown regime.

As we pointed out yesterday, whatever tumbles out of the Counterfeiting Talks is voluntary, most of it deals with fertilisers and jeans, and the UK and Ireland are likely to ignore it - having knocked themselves out with their own online copyright legislation. If you're concerned about undemocratic supranational governance, and it's a reasonable concern, there are more obvious candidates.

But critics have pointed out there's a straightforward way to evade ACTA - simply move the operations to a country unlikely ever to implement the Treaty. Nations taking part include the USA, EU members, Japan and Korea, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, and Australia. But participation doesn't mean cooperation or consent. The list also includes Canada, but Canada hasn't even implemented the 1996 WIPO provisions, which unlike ACTA are binding.

That leaves about 160 countries where a Facebook or a Google could choose to relocate. The safest, of course, being China. The People's Republic is unlikely to ever implement ACTA, and provides a "safe harbour" for any technology company fleeing copyright law.

Perhaps Google ought to rethink its China policy. Or get a Season Pass. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
China hopes home-grown OS will oust Microsoft
Doesn't much like Apple or Google, either
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years
Man jailed for dodgy cinema recording of Hollywood movie
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?