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Cybercrime talks end in failure

US and Euros object to proposed changes

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Plans to ratify an updated version of a global treaty against cybercrime have failed.

Negotiations on modifying the Budapest Convention on Cybercrime to take into account third world objections and the move to cloud computing floundered after delegates attending an international conference in Brazil last week failed to reach an agreement. The proposed changes, sponsored by Russia, failed to win over US and European delegates, resulting in an impasse, Public Sector Technology reports. More details on the deliberations can be found in our earlier story here.

The situation is echoes the way objections led by China resulted in a inconclusive end to the Copenhagen round of climate change negotiations last year.

A UN advisory committee will now re-examine the proposals to develop possible mechanisms for law enforcement agencies to collaborate more effectively on fighting cybercrime and to consider the implications of cloud computing, which affects the physical location where data of interest to investigators might be stored.

A total of 29 countries, mostly from Europe but also the USA, have ratified the Budapest Convention since its adoption by Council of Europe in 2001. A further 19 countries - including the UK and Spain - have signed but not ratified the treaty. ®

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