Feeds

Apple in shock public attack on Adobe

I know Flash is but what am I?

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Apple has issued a shock public attack on Adobe Flash.

Of course, it's not the attack that's shocking - just the public bit. Typically, the MO of the Jobsian cult is to abuse Adobe Flash behind closed doors - or simply ban it from popular handheld devices.

On Wednesday, Apple PR sent a - gasp! - statement to CNET regarding the ongoing Adobe kerfuffle, and the irony is that it called Flash "closed and proprietary".

Earlier this month, Apple released its SDK for the upcoming iPhone OS 4.0, and unlike previous versions of the kit, it bars developers from accessing the company's APIs through any sort of intermediary layer that translates applications written in ways Steve Jobs doesn't approve of. Adobe was days away from introducing its Flash Professional CS5 development suite, which includes an iPhone packager for translating Flash scripts into Jesus Phone apps, and many assumed that Apple's SDK change was a direct attack on the company.

Adobe platform evangelist Lee Brimelow even went to far as to tell Apple to "Go screw yourself".

Apparently, he wasn't speaking for Adobe. But early on Wednesday, Adobe announced it has ceased development of its iPhone packager, and Mike Chambers - principal product manager for Flash - took the opportunity to get his own dig in. "As developers for the iPhone have learned, if you want to develop for the iPhone you have to be prepared for Apple to reject or restrict your development at any time, and for seemingly any reason," he said.

"The primary goal of Flash has always been to enable cross browser, platform and device development. The cool Web game that you build can easily be targeted and deployed to multiple platforms and devices. However, this is the exact opposite of what Apple wants. They want to tie developers down to their platform, and restrict their options to make it difficult for developers to target other platforms."

Believe or not, Apple actually responded to this. "Someone has it backwards," spokeswoman Trudy Muller said in her statement to Cnet. "It is HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and H.264 (all supported by the iPhone and iPad) that are open and standard, while Adobe's Flash is closed and proprietary."

You may support Apple's decision to ban Flash from the iPhone and the iPad. You may agree with Steve Jobs when he calls it "buggy," littered with security holes, and a "CPU hog". You may favor a web built on open standards. But surely only Apple can convince itself that such open standards include H.264.

Not to mention the fact that its statement doesn't address Adobe's issue. But it actually released a statement. Really. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Back to the ... drawing board: 'Hoverboard' will disappoint Marty McFly wannabes
Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.