European Commission details Five Year Security Plan

Stronger data protection, ID theft to be a crime

The European Commission has revealed some more details of how it intends to get the Stockholm Programme to strengthen security enacted into law by 2014.

The Commission promises to strengthen data protection law, make ID theft a criminal offence, introduce new hacking offences, improve the rights of those accused of crimes, make cross-border debt recovery easier and introduce an "entry and exit" border security system.

The latest "concrete actions" will form the basis of laws - in the European Parliament at least - to enact the Stockholm Programme.

The Commission is looking for a European-wide response to how to hand Passenger Name Records to countries outwith the EC. It will also negotiate a long-term agreement with the US over the transfer of financial information in the name of tracking terrorists.

By 2012 the Commission aims to have criminalised identity theft across the continent.

It will evaluate and if necessary pass laws to improve the data retention directive by the same year.

It will look at intra-corporate transfer - moving staff from country to country but within one company. It will also seek a common European asylum system.

EU citizens outside the community will be able to seek consular help from any EC country's embassy or consulate.

Businesses should also find it easier to pursue debts across borders.

More here. ®

Sponsored: Designing and building an open ITOA architecture