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Rogue admin waits for verdict

BOFH faces jail for password refusal

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San Francisco's rogue sysadmin Terry Childs, who refused to reveal passwords when he was sacked, could learn his fate later today.

The jury has started deliberating on whether Childs is guilty of locking the city out of its own network. He faces up to five years in prison if found guilty. Childs refused to hand over passwords when he was sacked in 2008.

Childs' defence is that this was an employment dispute which got out of hand. They say the BOFH refused to hand over passwords because he believed the people demanding them, during a conference call, were not capable of following proper security procedures.

Closing arguments were heard yesterday and the jury looked relieved that no more evidence would be presented, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

After 12 days, during which the FibreWAN worked perfectly, Childs was visited in prison by San Francisco's mayor Gavin Newsom and agreed to hand over the passwords.

He was charged with various computer offences in mid-2008. The trial began in December. ®

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