Feeds

Election promises: Wi-Fi chain gangs and maximum wage

What the other 'sensible' parties are proposing

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

The big three are not the only parties in the coming general election. Here are some highlights the other allegedly sensible parties might have in store for us if elected.

First up, the Green Party, which might just steal a seat in the Brighton Pavilion constituency. Their manifesto (pdf), like those of the Lib Dems and Labour, goes large on the f-word: "fair". However, this is a far more radical effort.

Like the Lib Dems, the Greens struggle with the dilemma of how to impose a radical new vision on society while maintaining some respect for basic individual liberties – and time and again, they end up failing that test. For instance, they demand a "fashion industry ban on size 0 models to reduce pressure on girls to conform to an unhealthy and unrealistic ideal".

Undoubtedly, there is a case for such a move – but the means chosen is nanny-ish in the extreme. The Greens' manifesto is more socialist – and far more feminist – than Labour's. In addition to the very predictable new approach to climate change, there is a serious whiff of fairness through enforced equality: as well as a minimum wage, the Greens would impose a maximum one too.

Far-reaching tax changes would bring about financial and economic equality, both at the individual and corporate level, very much in line with the party's view that an equal society is a happier society.

They have thought hard and widely about issues. They oppose ID cards, have grave concerns over the development of a national dataset, including detailed biometric data, and would like a citizen's right of access to information held on them by government. They would ensure digital access for all – another hostage to state intervention, giving BT an obligation to provide affordable high-speed broadband-capable infrastructure to every household.

They alone would implement a radical reform of drug laws. While it is easy to categorise the detail of their manifesto in terms of old-fashioned politics, what they are proposing does not fit the existing political mould and is worth reading if only for a genuinely alternative view of how politics could be.

UKIP might just bring about electoral upset in Buckingham, where their former leader Nigel Farage is breaking with a political tradition that allows the Speaker of the House of Commons to be returned unopposed and standing against current incumbent John Bercow.

As one might expect, the UKIP manifesto, Empowering the People, has a lot to say about the evils of Europe and how we would be better off without its interference. Like the Lib Dems, they would significantly raise the threshold at which tax begins to be paid – to £11,500. They also float the interesting idea of combining tax and National Insurance into a single system.

They would cut public spending, but invest in job creation. Defence would benefit. So, too, would the nuclear power industry and flood defences. They anticipate many more prisoners – courtesy of a "three strikes" policy - and a prison-building scheme would be put in hand to double prison capacity.

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Alphadex fires back at British Gas with overcharging allegation
Brit colo outfit says it paid for 347KVA, has been charged for 1940KVA
Jack the RIPA: Blighty cops ignore law, retain innocents' comms data
Prime minister: Nothing to see here, go about your business
Singapore decides 'three strikes' laws are too intrusive
When even a prurient island nation thinks an idea is dodgy it has problems
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.