Feeds

Microsoft yanks KIN ad boob

Don't get tits out for lad(ie)s, after all

Boost IT visibility and business value

Microsoft has deleted a clip from one of its KIN ads that showed a young bloke surreptitiously photographing his breast before sending the image to a woman.

Redmond apologised for including the scene in the ad for its new so-called "social phone", after an alarmist US consumer group complained that the clip promoted sexting among youngsters.

"Microsoft has deleted the inappropriate portion of the Kin video. We take sexting very seriously, & are sorry it happened," said the vendor on its Safer_Online Twitter account.

As we reported last Thursday, Microsoft's advert for its latest mobile device prompted the Consumer Reports group to wonder if the company was promoting the idea of its customers sending racy texts to one another via the KIN by including a "downright creepy sequence", it opined.

For the record, we at El Reg think it was all an overreaction to a millisecond flash of male flesh and nipple being captured on a mobile device in one of Microsoft's reliably head-scratch inducing ads. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.