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Microsoft yanks KIN ad boob

Don't get tits out for lad(ie)s, after all

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Microsoft has deleted a clip from one of its KIN ads that showed a young bloke surreptitiously photographing his breast before sending the image to a woman.

Redmond apologised for including the scene in the ad for its new so-called "social phone", after an alarmist US consumer group complained that the clip promoted sexting among youngsters.

"Microsoft has deleted the inappropriate portion of the Kin video. We take sexting very seriously, & are sorry it happened," said the vendor on its Safer_Online Twitter account.

As we reported last Thursday, Microsoft's advert for its latest mobile device prompted the Consumer Reports group to wonder if the company was promoting the idea of its customers sending racy texts to one another via the KIN by including a "downright creepy sequence", it opined.

For the record, we at El Reg think it was all an overreaction to a millisecond flash of male flesh and nipple being captured on a mobile device in one of Microsoft's reliably head-scratch inducing ads. ®

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