Feeds
85%

Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Conviction

Classic territory

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Splinter Cell ConvictionReview

Sam Fisher's sixth videogame outing, and his first in almost four years, marks a further refinement of the core principles of the Splinter Cell franchise. The real-world credibility provided by Clancy's endorsement remains intact, as does Sam's modus operandi of infiltrate, interrogate and assassinate. Even the story, although devoid of the geopolitics of previous entries, still resounds with murky government agencies, PMCs and EMPs.

What has changed, however, is something of a quiet revolution. By introducing a much greater sandbox approach to gameplay, Ubisoft had successfully broadened the series' appeal to a wider audience, one previously turned off by its traditionally punishing pedantics. Sure, the developers have tinkered with the core game mechanic of stealth before, especially apparent between the soul-destroyingly difficult Pandora Tomorrow and the more forgiving Chaos Theory, but Splinter Cell has never felt so accessible and, dare I say it, fun!

Whereas in previous games missing alarms, being caught in spotlights, or not concealing dead bodies, invariably meant game over, in all but one of Conviction's single-player levels such mistakes now result in far less finite outcomes: messy, frenetic gunfights against multiple hostiles.

That's not to say you'll always survive such gunfights - Sam Fisher is still no bullet sponge. But at least got a fighting chance to survive and continue the level uninterrupted.

In relaxing the rigidity of stealth, Ubisoft has also been careful not to alienate the series' hardcore fanbase. Stealth still remains the absolute best strategy. And while Conviction offers no particular reward for avoiding enemy guards altogether, there certainly is for killing them surreptitiously.

For every hand-to-hand kill, you're rewarded with a single burst of a new mode called Mark and Execute. Depending on the weapon in hand, you can tag up to four different targets. Once tagged and in range, markers turn red, signalling you're just one button press away from executing them with single, automated bullet-time shots.

Whose round?

Application security programs and practises

Next page: Last Known Position

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Microsoft unsheathes cheap Android-killer: Behold, the Lumia 530
Say it with us: I'm King of the Landfill-ill-ill-ill
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.