Feeds

MS kernel patch skirts infected machines

Damage control bypasses pwned PCs

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

Microsoft's latest batch of patches contains a kernel update designed not to install on machines infected with a rootkit.

The move is designed to prevent the confusion that occurred when one of the patches released in February resulted in a Blue Screen of Death and continuous reboot cycles on some Windows XP machines.

Microsoft copped a fair bit of criticism for the incident before the cause was pinned down to the interaction between the hard-to-detect Tdss rootkit and a Windows kernel security update. Rootkits are a type of malware that attempt to avoid detection by anti-virus scanners by burying themselves in the likes of Windows kernel code.

Redmond's April patch batch also contains a Windows kernel patch. In an effort to prevent the same snafu as February, Microsoft is using technology designed to prevent the update from installing onto malware-compromised machines.

"This security update includes package-detection logic that prevents the installation of the security update if certain abnormal conditions exist" Microsoft explains in the FAQ for its MS10-21 patch.

"These abnormal conditions on a system could be the result of an infection with a computer virus that modifies some operating system files, which renders the infected computer incompatible with the kernel update."

The same technology was used in a modified version of the MS10-15 update, which was initially released as part of February's Patch Tuesday and revised with an "avoid infected systems" add-on in mid-March.

Users who attempt to install either the revised MS010-15 package or the new Ms10-021 kernel update on infected machines ought to get an error code.

Possible error codes (such as 0x8007F0F4) fail to explain what might have gone wrong, but a bit of judicious searching ought to direct sys admins or regular users who hit the snag to this advisory here. This notice explains that users who run across problems installing the patch are probably dealing with a malware-infected machine.

Microsoft's April patch batch included 11 bulletins along with an update to the software giant's Malicious Software Removal Tool. The idea is that this tool will remove malware and clean up systems which can then by safely patched at the second time of asking. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
14 antivirus apps found to have security problems
Vendors just don't care, says researcher, after finding basic boo-boos in security software
'Things' on the Internet-of-things have 25 vulnerabilities apiece
Leaking sprinklers, overheated thermostats and picked locks all online
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Only '3% of web servers in top corps' fully fixed after Heartbleed snafu
Just slapping a patched OpenSSL on a machine ain't going to cut it, we're told
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers
Corporate raiders Comment Crew fingered for attacks
Tor attack nodes RIPPED MASKS off users for 6 MONTHS
Traffic confirmation attack bared users' privates - but to whom?
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.