Feeds

Ellison's database customers slip slidin' to x86

Where's a server deal when you need one?

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

When Oracle chief executive Larry Ellison doubled down on Unix with his $5.6bn acquisition of Sun Microsystems, his customers were moving away from RISC systems.

Half of Oracle's customers are running their database instances on x86, while those who aren't will do so "shortly".

A survey of Oracle customers found that while just over two-thirds run their database environments on Unix - with Solaris the single most popular flavor - x86 is catching up.

The poll, just released, was conducted by the Independent Oracle Users' Group and surveyed 400 individuals - half DBAs - in organizations of varying sizes. VMware sponsored the study, called Towards a smarter information foundation.

Four out of 10 are already running Oracle instances on x86 servers with another six per cent planning to do so within the coming year, according to the IOUG.

IOUG also found that besides Oracle, Microsoft 's SQL Server - which only runs on Windows and x86 - is by far the most popular database (91 pet cent use it). It's followed by MySQL (44 per cent).

Virtualization is emerging as a way to help control the costs associated with bolting on all this extra x86, by cramming more instances of Oracle software and greater amounts of data on to the same or fewer boxes.

Sixty two per cent with Oracle on x86 use virtualization compared to 43 per cent for non x86-based Oracle sites. Cost savings associated with server hardware virtualization and an overall reduction in hardware costs were given as the leading reasons for companies adopting virtualization - 76 per cent and 59 per cent, respectively.

Among the top three issues hindering greater rollout: lack of budget is the biggest business obstacle (36 per cent) and political or organizational kick back (28 per cent). These included resistance from DBAs who'd had bad experiences with earlier versions of the technology and vendor support, with customers not running a version of virtualization software that the vendor has tested.

The technology hurdles to adoption were performance issues (38 per cent) and concerns about back up and restores, bottlenecks, and potential growth in storage and disk space needs (27 per cent in all cases). ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes
4TB of home storage is great, until you wake up to a dead device
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Internet Security Threat Report 2014
An overview and analysis of the year in global threat activity: identify, analyze, and provide commentary on emerging trends in the dynamic threat landscape.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.