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Vendors bet on England World Cup fail

Offer money back if team wins

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Firms are falling over themselves to cash in on the Fifa World Cup. TomTom today was the latest manufacturer to pledge to refund the purchase price on one of its offerings if England wins the international soccer tournament.

By a TomTom Go 550 satnav between now and 8 June, and you'll get your money back if Rooney and Co. carry off the trophy.

Toshiba has already made the same claim, promising to give anyone who buys one of its laptops or tellies the kit for free if England is victorious.

And Elgato, supplier of quality TV tuners to Mac users, has pledged to do likewise for buyers of its EyeTV Deluxe - reviewed here, by the way.

It's ironic, perhaps, that none of these companies are English, but then who are we to turn down the offer of free - sort of; you still have to pay for it in the first instance - kit?

Well if not us, how about bookie William Hill. It's offering odds of five to one on an England win, the same odds it's offering Brazil. The favourite is Spain, with odds of four to one. The winner in 2006, Italy, is on 12 to one. ®

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