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KIN'ell, Microsoft! Is that a breasticle I see before me?

Let me get my hands on your mammary gland

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Is a man's nipple erotic? If, dear reader, you answer yes to that question then perhaps Microsoft's latest efforts to advertise its wares should be slammed for promoting so-called sexting among young people.

Earlier this week the software vendor unveiled its KIN "social phone", which is a mobile that nods happily in the direction of the Palm Pre, Sidekick, Apple's iPhone and, well, a male mammary gland.

Microsoft's advert for its latest device prompted the Consumer Reports group to wonder if the company was promoting the idea of its customers sending racy texts to one another via the KIN.

"The video, on a promotional site for the new phones, includes a downright creepy sequence in which a young man is shown putting a KIN under his shirt and apparently snapping a picture of one of his naked breasts," noted Mike Gikas on the Consumer Reports Electronics blog.

"The breast is then shown on the phone's screen, just before the guy apparently sends it to someone. Next we see the face of a young woman, seemingly the recipient, with an amused expression on her face."

The subtext appears to be that the Consumer Reports group is concerned that young people will use KIN to enjoy some sexy time via their social phone.

We at Vulture Towers, however, feel that the organisation should be more concerned about Microsoft's erratic efforts to produce an ad campaign that is actually good at selling the firm's products.

Microsoft's latest attempt to convince more people to sign up to Hotmail is a perfect case in point.

The company has slapped clumsy ads on billboards across the UK that tells passers-by about the "New Busy", which is presumably a bit like saying Hotmail is the "new black".

Sadly, this being Microsoft, that fails to tell punters much about the actual product.

"Are not like the old busy. Let the old busy have their stress balls, their antacids and their crazy eyes," reads the nonsensical blurb accompanying one of the ads, which presumably isn't describing everyone's favourite chair flinger, Steve Ballmer. ®

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