Feeds

Overzealous Orange cuts off customer, still bills

Who are you? And where's our money?

Remote control for virtualized desktops

A confused Orange disconnected a customer after he cancelled his brother's account, and then insisted he pay for the suspended line until he produced ID to get reconnected.

The chap in question, one Peter McDougall, signed a contract with Orange in December, but his line was cut without warning in the middle of last week. He called Orange (on another line) and was told he'd have to go to an Orange store and prove his identity to have the phone reconnected.

And no, he couldn't stop paying for the service he was no longer receiving.

We asked Orange what was going on, and the company said: "We noticed excessive usage so we wanted to ensure everything was ok with the account." That sounded perfectly reasonable, except that Orange made no attempt to contact the customer other than one failed call to his landline. And there was no excessive use on the suspended account.

Not that McDougall even got that information - he was simply told that Orange didn't have his ID, and therefore wouldn't reconnect the line, though it was still happy to accept the signature on his contract and thus continue taking his money.

Following our enquiries Orange did reconnect the line and apologise, though it took longer to work out what went wrong.

The problem, it seems, was that McDougall set up a SIM-only account for his brother, who promptly ran up a decent bill and thus surrendered his familial phone rights. The brother's connection was paid off and cancelled.

Two days later Orange decided this was all very dodgy and cut off Peter McDougall's own account without warning. Suggestions that there might be some confusion with his brother's account were initially dismissed, and he was told that Orange's security department had simply realised it didn't have his ID on file and therefore cut off his line.

We're glad Orange has reconnected the line, and hopefully will be ensuring that this remains an isolated incident. Even the operator now admits that "a text message asking the customer to call us would have been more appropriate", which is really the least of it. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up
Turning it off and on again fixes glitch 12 HOURS LATER
BEST EVER broadband? Oh no you DIDN'T, Sky – ad watchdog
Rival BT moaned that claim was misleading
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.