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NoSQL player questions big data

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Memcached specialist Gear6 is blending the DMBS features of query and search with the big data world of NoSQL while aligning with a VMware favorite.

The company has announced that it's adding native query capabilities to its Memecached distribution, to turn its Memecached into what it called a "NoSQL-like store".

Gear6 will also announce its Gear 6 Web Cache Memcached server is to be integrated with Redis, one of the NoSQL family of data processing architectures for handling big data in cloud computing environments and sponsored by virtualization market leader VMware. VMware last month hired Redis founder and lead developer Salvatore Sanfilippo.

Gear6 said that users could build, develop and deploy dynamic data services through the integration of its Memcached and Redis products.

Asked whether it would also support other NoSQL contenders, such as MongoDB and Cassandra, executive vice president of products Joaquin Ruiz said it was still really early days in the Key-Value (KV) space.

However, Ruiz said: "Redis is one that's already out there, it's proven, in production and supported by a large, stable player so won't go away, so we really endorse and like the technology." There's no date when Redis will be added to Gear6's Memcached.

Also, due to be announced, is the ability for Gear6's Memcached implementation to be sliced up and run in Linux-based servers instead of just as a single cloud instance.

Gear6 is now available as a DEB package for Ubuntu Lucid Lynx due this week plus older versions of Ubuntu, Debian plus RPM formats for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS.

The updates will be announced at the MySQL Conference in Santa Clara, California. Ruiz said the event is a good platform because many KV technologies are used in conjunction with MySQL while up to 40 per cent to Gear6's core acceleration business is MySQL.

Ruiz said Gear6 is adding native query because customers want to search the growing volumes of unstructured data they've been storing and retrieving from Memcached systems without bolting on a full-blown DBMS.

He said you might use the query in Memcached to quickly analyze a series of website cookies to find a strong of objects with a price or name index. "Unstructured data sets are growing at ridiculous speeds," Ruiz said. "Customers want high access and low latency." ®

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