Feeds

Labour shock pledge: 16.8-meg broadband for ALL by 2012!

The Thick of IT

The essential guide to IT transformation

The Labour party has mounted a strong counterattack against the Tories' determined push to present themselves as the most technologically illiterate of the mainstream UK parties.

As part of Labour's election manifesto, unveiled today, the present government was widely expected to renew previous pledges that every household in Blighty would soon be connected to a line capable of providing normal-ish 2 megabit/sec broadband speeds. But in fact Labour have gone much further:

It's official. Labour will get you 16.8 meg broadband by the end of next year. Minimum

Megabit, megabyte. Who cares except nerds, right?

This is a notable difference, of course, as two megabytes is no less than 16,777,216 bits - say 16.8 megabits. Many existing copper phone lines - the majority means of delivering broadband to the UK home - struggle even to provide the rather paltry 2 Mbit/sec that Labour meant to promise, and a majority are quite incapable of 16 Mbit/sec in reality (no matter the exorbitant "rates of up to this or that" promises made by ISPs).

BT executives, in charge of most of these phone lines, will no doubt be spitting coffee all over their screens as they learn that they'll have to get every line in the country up to 17-meg standards in less than 19 months after a Labour victory.

Or they would if this isn't simply a case of politicians and those who work for them knowing almost nothing of technology, anyway, as seems likely.

And don't think that voting Tory is going to usher in a new age of well-informed ministers either, as this recent contribution to the Reg by shadow housing minister Grant Shapps illustrates all too well. ®

Bootnote

Many thanks to Reg reader Andrew and the many others who pointed out the relevant passage.

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Hello, police, El Reg here. Are we a bunch of terrorists now?
Do Brits risk arrest for watching beheading video nasty? We asked the fuzz
UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones
Met Police calls for mandatory passwords on all new mobes
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
EU justice chief blasts Google on 'right to be forgotten'
Don't pretend it's a freedom of speech issue – interim commish
Detroit losing MILLIONS because it buys CHEAP BATTERIES – report
Man at hardware store was right: name brands DO last longer
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.