Feeds

Google goes to Blighty for Goggles polish

Borgs Plink visual search startup

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Google has acquired UK-based visual search outfit Plink, with the intention of rolling the newly public startup into Mountain View's fledgling Google Goggles project.

This is the company's first-ever UK acquisition.

Plink co-founders Mark Cummins and James Philbin announced the news on Monday with a blog post. "We started Plink to bring the power of visual search to everyone, and we’re delighted to be taking a big step towards that goal today," said the pair, who founded Plink while PhD students at Oxford University in the department of engineering's mobile robotics and visual geometry groups.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The startup's inaugural product was an Android application dubbed PlinkArt, a tool that attempts to identify artwork snapped with a camera phone and provide relevant information on the work and its artist. According to Cummins and Philbin, the app has been downloaded over 50,000 times since its launch four months ago.

Like PlinkArt, Google Goggles is an Android application that attempts to match camera pics to those stored in a web-based image database. One of its advertised uses is, yes, identifying artwork. It can also do character recognition, if you wanted to, say, input the information from a business card into your phone's contact manager. And separate from its image-recognition tools, it can identify local business via GPS and compass.

"Google has already shown that it’s serious about investing in this space with Google Goggles, and for the Plink team, the opportunity to take our algorithms to Google-scale was just too exciting to pass up," Cummins and Philbin said.

PlinkArt will still be available for download, but it will no longer be updated. Instead, Cummins and Philbin say, they will focus their efforts on Google Goggles. In December, Google awarded Plink $10,000 as a winner of its Android Developer Challenge contest, after a vote by Android users and a panel of judges. ®

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
Apple Watch will CONQUER smartwatch world – analysts
After Applelocalypse, other wristputers will get stuck in
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.