Feeds

HP slides Slate into iPad slipstream

Color me Pink

The Power of One Infographic

Hewlett-Packard is riding on the back of Apple's iPad by touting features of its planned Slate rival, which runs Windows 7.

The company has released a video that demonstrates at least four features not included in Steve Jobs' iPad: two cameras - one for photos and one for video conferencing on Skype, a USB port to connect to other consumer and computing devices, and an SD card to expand the onboard memory and share content with devices like mobile phones also using SD cards.

The thirty-second, Euro-house pumping video also demonstrates Apple's iTunes running on Windows.

The HP Voodoo Blog playing the video also highlights the fact the Slate will work with Adobe's Flash and the Flash-based Air. Apple's chief executive and i-everying creator Steve Jobs recently slammed Flash for being a "CPU hog" and full of security holes.

The PC maker said on its blog: "Take a look at our newest video. As you'll see, we're putting a lot of thought into the design to make sure we deliver an optimal mobile experience."

HP's video comes just days after Apple launched the iPad, and is clearly timed to ride the meme of coverage on Jobs' latest creation powering through the internet's news sites, and generate greater interest and "excitement" in HP's Windows-powered tablet push.

When it was unveiled by Microsoft chief executive Steve Ballmer at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada, HP released no details about the Slate. Ballmer also showed off Windows-powered tablets from Pegatron and Archos at CES.

All we've known so far is that HP's Slate will run touch APIs found in Windows 7. Before Windows 7, HP used touch APIs in Windows in its Touch Smart PCs.

Meanwhile, Microsoft has also jumped on the iPad wave to promote a forthcoming launch of its own. The company is reported to have invited press to an event in San Francisco, California, on April 12 with a cryptically worded offer that said "It's time to share". The invite is understood to refer to the launch of Pink, Microsoft's social networking service for mobile phones. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
NEW Raspberry Pi B+, NOW with - count them - FOUR USB ports
Composite vid socket binned as GPIO sprouts new pins
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.