Feeds

Apple borgs (alleged) iPad chip designers

Intrinsity vanishes into Jobsian embrace

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Apple has consumed at least part of Intrinsity, a small microprocessor outfit that allegedly designed the chip at the heart of the iPad, according to a report citing the LinkedIn profiles of multiple Intrinsity employees.

Last week, EDN reported that Intrinsity had been sold, and guessed that Apple was the buyer. Then on Friday, a day before the iPad launch, Macrumors turned up LinkedIn profiles indicating that a trio of Intrinsity engineers had entered the Cupertino cult. Two of these profiles were subsequently changed, but the third still indicates that one of these engineers is working for Apple as of April 1.

Incidentally, the Intrinsity website is not available - it's "currently under construction."

EDN and others have long speculated that the 1GHz A4 chip driving the iPad was designed by Intrinsity and manufactured by Samsung. Last year, Samsung said it had teamed with Instrinsity on a 1GHz ARM chip known as the Hummingbird, and Samsung manufacturers the ARM chips underpinning the Apple iPhone.

In 2008, Apple acquired boutique chip designer PA Semi, and later that year Steve Jobs indicated that PA engineers would build "systems-on-chips" for future versions of the iPhone and iPad, and it was widely assumed that the PA team was behind the iPad's A4. But industry rumor indicates that many PA employees - including those who once ran the company - have left following Apple's takeover.

No word on whether Steve Jobs has hired a team of assassins to hunt them down and strangle them with black mock turtlenecks.

Intrinsity traces its roots to Exponential Technology, a company that worked to build ultra-fast PowerPC chips for the Apple Mac back in the 1990s. Apple was an investor in Exponential and it was quoted in a press release trumpeting the company's chips. But the two soon had a falling out, with Apple declining to actually use the chips and Exponential suing the Mac maker.

Which is not to say we're reading some sort of nefarious plot into Apple hiring those Intrinsity chip engineers. Presumably, Jobs wants them for their chip engineering skills. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Back to the ... drawing board: 'Hoverboard' will disappoint Marty McFly wannabes
Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit
USB-serial imitators whacked by driver update
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.