Feeds

AMD tempts gamers with multi-monitor Eye candy

One card, six displays, one billion pixels

Intelligent flash storage arrays

AMD has announced a new graphics card that can fill six displays with over one billion pixels per second to provide what the company unblushingly claims to be "the ultimate in entertainment and productivity".

The Wednesday announcement of the expansively named ATI Radeon HD 5870 Eyefinity 6 Edition notes that users of the card can benefit from the "well-developed ecosystem" of ATI's Eyefinity technology, and that the new card will use updated Catalyst drivers.

ATI Radeon HD 5870 Eyefinity 6 Edition

Six independent display controllers support either six independent displays or one unified mega-view

Although AMD pays some lip service to the Eyefinity 6's productivity capabilities - think multiple-monitor spreadsheet, business intelligence, and newsfeed setups - the card's clear target is the gamer who wants a wrap-around, immersive experience. As the company gushes: "Think of it as Surround Sight." The release specifically cites Codemasters' DiRT 2 and EA's Battlefield: Bad Company 2, both which can take advantage of the card's DirectX 11 support.

Bezel compensation is available in the March 2010 Catalyst 10.3 driver, but to benefit from it, all your displays will need to have pixel densities of within five per cent of each other.

The Radeon HD 5870 GPU driving the Eyefinity 6 is a 40 nanometer, 2.1 billion transistors beastie with 1,600 stream processing units. Its GDDR5 interface provides 153.6 gigabytes per second of bandwidth - the Eyefinity 6 comes with 2GB of GDDR5 memory. It supports OpenGL 3.2 and OpenCL 1.0, and connects to your machine over its PCI Express 2.1 x16 bus interface.

A full listing of the ATI Radeon HD 5870 Eyefinity 6 Edition's specs, speeds, and feeds can be found here. Pricing and availability were not included in today's announcement, and AMD did not immediately respond to our requests for any hint as to when the Eyefinity 6 might be available and how much it might set you back. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Apple spent just ONE DOLLAR beefing up the latest iPad Air 2
New iPads look a lot like the old one. There's a reason for that
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Microsoft fitness bands slapped on wrists: All YOUR HEALTH DATA are BELONG TO US
Wearable will deliver 'actionable insights for healthier living'
Caterham Seven 160 review: The Raspberry Pi of motoring
Back to driving's basics with a joyously legal high
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
Amazon hopes FIRE STICK will light up its video service
We do streaming video? It seems we do...
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?