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BlackBerry hooks up with LinkedIn

Business handset gets business networking

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BlackBerry users finally have a LinkedIn client, joining iPhone and Palm users who've had mobile access to the business networking service for months.

Given the business focus of LinkedIn, which presents itself as a serious business tool rather than a playground for turning popularity into gaming success, it's surprising we've not seen a BlackBerry client before - the demographic would seem to overlap nicely.

iPhone users got a LinkedIn client a couple of weeks back, and early reviews describe the app as functional but dull - which would seem to fit the LinkedIn service well.

First comments on the BlackBerry version would seem to bear that out, though mostly the feedback seems to be centred on annoyance at the lack of Storm compatibility - only the Curve, Bold and Tour are supported.

But for most of us the LinkedIn client provides one more excuse for the people we address in meetings to be tapping away on their phones while pretending to pay attention (sorry - efficiently multitasking). ®

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