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Orange to slash price of top iPhone plan

£75 for unlimited calls, texts, internet

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Exclusive Orange will this week tweak its iPhone pay monthly plans to introduce a new package offering unlimited calls and unlimited texts.

The plan will cost £75 a month and is only available with a two-year contract. Essentially, it's Orange's former £125-a-month package, reissued for £50 a month less.

Like other iPhone packages, the £75-a-month plan includes voicemail and unlimited internet access, but also includes 100 minutes call time and a 20MB of mobile data when you roam in Europe and Ireland. These are both available as optional extras to other plans.

Itemised billing comes free of charge - it's £1.50 a month usually - and included 3GB of data transfer when you use the iPhone as a modem. Folk on other Orange iPhone tariffs pay £5 a month for that - and the same for unlimited texting which is bundled on the £75 plan.

Take out a £75-a-month deal, and Orange will give you the handset - be it an 8GB 3G, a 16GB 3GS or a 32GB 3GS - for free.

The new tariff will be available to buy on 1 April. ®

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