Feeds

MSI tells 97,000 customers to 'Read The F***ing Manual'

Support reps live the dream

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

Late last week, global hardware manufacturer MSI informed the 97,000+ people registered with its support forums that its reps were "fed up" with repeating information easily found in user manuals. The company even went so far as to say that it had installed an "RTFM" chip on its hardware boards to determine whether users had read their manuals and that anyone who hadn't read them would be banned from support.

For the uninitiated, RTFM is a widely recognized acronym for "Read The Fucking Manual".

"The MSI-forum and MSI-support team are fed-up with explaining you what can be found in the manual," read an email message from the support team, which apparently went to every person registered for the company's support forums, including customers, vendors, and press. "I mean, come on, how hard is it to read a manual? They are printed on paper so you see them."

The so-called RTFM chip, the email went on to say, had been monitoring the behavior of users for "some time".

"So MSI decided to ban people from support, RMA, and the forum who has done the damage themselves or didn't read the manual the first of next month," it said. "We know who you are, and we have gathered enough information via our RTFM-chip."

The email went out on March 25, and the company's support team now says it was an April Fools' joke. "We are sorry people took this for prank for serious [sic]," reads a forum post and email message from the company's support team head. "We thought of this prank after answering the many posts where people ask the obvious that is already in the manual.

"But we learned a valuable lesson, no more April-fools jokes from the forum...Sorry that you took it for real and got mad."

What's more, some people didn't take it for real and got mad. "The 'joke' might have been funny if you'd maybe not been quite so abrasive about it," says one poster. "And as pointed out by others, you're WELL off the mark for an April Fools joke. There's a pretty limited window for April Fools gags and you lot now just look like idiots."

For the uninitiated, April Fools' jokes typically occur on April 1 - not March 25.

You can argue whether the email was a joke or a rogue message from some embittered support rep who finally went over the edge or somewhere in between. But one thing's for certain: Idiot is not too strong a word. ®

Bootnote

Thanks to Reg readers Simon and Andrew.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
WRISTJOB LOVE BONANZA: justWatch sex app promises blind date hookups
Mankind shuffles into the future, five fingers at a time
Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen
Angry Microsoftie hauls auctioneers to court over stalled Pzkw. IV 'deal'
Apple's Mr Havisham: Tim Cook says dead Steve Jobs' office has remained untouched
'I literally think about him every day' says biz baron's old friend
Flaming drone batteries ground commercial flight before takeoff
Passenger had Something To Declare, instead fiddled while plane burned
Cops apologise for leaving EXPLOSIVES in suitcase at airport
'Canine training exercise' SNAFU sees woman take home booming baggage
Oi, London thief. We KNOW what you're doing - our PRECRIME system warned us
Aye, shipmate, it be just like that Minority Report
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.