Feeds

Lads from Lagos pose as US troops to snare unwary ladies

'Breaking hearts and bank accounts' on home front

SANS - Survey on application security programs

The Lads from Lagos have struck again, this time posing online as US servicemen at war overseas in order to become "romantically involved" with American women fond of a man in uniform and then "prey on their emotions and patriotism".

“We are seeing a number of scams being perpetrated on the internet, especially on social, dating-type websites where females are the main target,” explained Chris Grey, spokesman for the US Army Criminal Investigation Command.

“These perpetrators, often from other countries, most notably from Ghana, Angola and Nigeria, are good at what they do and quite familiar with American culture,” he added.

US military investigators say that female victims of the online scammers have been "swindled out of thousands" by the Lads, who are cutting a swathe through American womanhood "breaking hearts and bank accounts" as they go.

According to the Army detectives, a scammer will often take on the true name and rank of a US serviceman fighting in Iraq or Afghanistan, generally acquiring photos from the internet to back up the imposture.

Having enticed a lady in the States into an online relationship (often including an early offer of marriage, which Grey says is highly unlikely in the case of a real US soldier) the crooks then begin to ask for money. The cash is often supposedly to be spent on phones or laptops to be used to keep in touch with the woman.

What makes US brass hats particularly cross about this is that the Lads will often falsely claim that soldiers overseas aren't allowed to make or receive phone calls or letters, or that they are denied access to their own bank accounts while in combat.

“We’ve even seen instances where the perpetrators are asking the victims for money to 'purchase leave papers' from the Army or help pay for their flight home so they can leave the war zone,” said Grey.

The US Army always, of course, provides its members with a free flight home from any war it may send them to - though in some cases a posthumous one. Nor does it charge fees for leave passes or permission to marry.

Grey and his colleagues at Army CID warn that there isn't a lot they can do to stop the scams, so it's simply down to American ladies to be a bit less credulous. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.