Feeds

Mozilla site to offer multi-browser add-on security check

Keeps tabs on more than just Firefox

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Mozilla plans to expand the reach of its web-based Plugin Check service so that it monitors whether add-ons on browsers from other suppliers are up to date and secure.

An earlier version of Plugin Check only checked whether Firefox installations were running with the latest version of Adobe Flash and Apple's QuickTime, for example. It's then up to surfers to visit relevant signposted websites and apply updates, which are not automatically downloaded.

The next version of the service provides a comparable check with Chrome, Safari and Opera add-ons. The technology will also work with new versions (7 and 8) of IE - although only a limited number of plug-ins to Microsoft's browser are checked by Mozilla's technology, Computerworld reports.

The cross-browser security check site, an extension of Firefox-only technology that launched last October, was due to debut on Wednesday but is not yet fully activated at the time of writing on Thursday. Checks on versions of Safari and Chrome running on a Mac detected version numbers of plug-ins but provided no information on whether they were up-to-date or not.

Security notification firm Secunia, which already provides similar functionality on the latest version of its Personal Software Inspector patching tool, which is available at no charge to home users, nonetheless welcomed Mozilla's move towards offering multi-browser security checks.

Thomas Kristensen, chief security officer at Secunia, told The Register that even though the Personal Software Inspector's coverage was "somewhat more extensive than what Mozilla offers" the browser maker's actions would help highlight the need to patch browser add-ons. "Lets hope that more [browser suppliers] will join the battle to thwart old insecure software," Kristensen said. "Patching is more important than having an anti-virus program and a personal firewall," he added. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.