Feeds

UK.gov spunked £153m on reorganisation IT

That's a lot of deckchairs

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The National Audit Office says that nearly 20 per cent of the £780m spent on central government reorganisations over the last four years has gone on IT.

Nearly half of departments reported that IT purchasing had a high or moderate cost impact on their reorganisation process and 45 per cent said the same about website development, according to NAO's report Reorganising central government.

The document, published on 18 March 2010, says there were an average of 20 reorganisations of Whitehall departments each year between May 2005 and June 2009.

The spending watchdog's scrutiny of 51 reorganisations revealed they had each cost an average of £15m, just under £200m a year overall.

"Because of the time pressure, transition teams in new departments have to plan and implement change simultaneously, while also dealing with challenges for which they have had no time to prepare," says the NAO.

"The transition team at the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills faced additional challenges of agreeing shared services arrangements, arranging contracts with suppliers, and setting up information technology systems."

Other problems highlighted in the report included delays in relocating Cabinet Office staff which required unexpected changes to IT for the Office of the Third Sector. Problems in migrating data resulted in file loss and harm to corporate memory.

The creation of a single team in government to oversee all government reorganisations is among the NAO's main recommendations. It also says that significant reorganisations should be announced to Parliament and the intended benefits should be set out in measurable terms.

Amyas Morse, head of the NAO, said: "With 90 reorganisations in four years, UK central government machinery is in a constant state of change. At approximately £200m per annum, the costs are far from negligible and the reorganisations inevitably involve disruption and loss of service.

"We believe a more deliberate and carefully planned process makes sense before such costs are incurred and would also like to see a slow down in the rate of change."

This article was originally published at Kable.

Kable's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.