Feeds

UK.gov spunked £153m on reorganisation IT

That's a lot of deckchairs

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

The National Audit Office says that nearly 20 per cent of the £780m spent on central government reorganisations over the last four years has gone on IT.

Nearly half of departments reported that IT purchasing had a high or moderate cost impact on their reorganisation process and 45 per cent said the same about website development, according to NAO's report Reorganising central government.

The document, published on 18 March 2010, says there were an average of 20 reorganisations of Whitehall departments each year between May 2005 and June 2009.

The spending watchdog's scrutiny of 51 reorganisations revealed they had each cost an average of £15m, just under £200m a year overall.

"Because of the time pressure, transition teams in new departments have to plan and implement change simultaneously, while also dealing with challenges for which they have had no time to prepare," says the NAO.

"The transition team at the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills faced additional challenges of agreeing shared services arrangements, arranging contracts with suppliers, and setting up information technology systems."

Other problems highlighted in the report included delays in relocating Cabinet Office staff which required unexpected changes to IT for the Office of the Third Sector. Problems in migrating data resulted in file loss and harm to corporate memory.

The creation of a single team in government to oversee all government reorganisations is among the NAO's main recommendations. It also says that significant reorganisations should be announced to Parliament and the intended benefits should be set out in measurable terms.

Amyas Morse, head of the NAO, said: "With 90 reorganisations in four years, UK central government machinery is in a constant state of change. At approximately £200m per annum, the costs are far from negligible and the reorganisations inevitably involve disruption and loss of service.

"We believe a more deliberate and carefully planned process makes sense before such costs are incurred and would also like to see a slow down in the rate of change."

This article was originally published at Kable.

Kable's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.