Feeds

Irate Aussies go after US website

World government is living in Sydney

Security for virtualized datacentres

The owner of a US website accused of breaking Australian law by the Australian Human Rights Commission has told them to rack right off.

Encyclopaedia Dramatica is a tasteless collection of articles along the lines of Sickipedia or Something Awful.

ED is refusing to bow to demands from the AHRC that it remove an article about aborigines.

The AHRC letter accuses the site's largest shareholder, Joseph Evers, of breaching the Australian Racial Discrimination Act. It said it had received 20 complaints about the website.

The AHRC insists that the site should follow Australian law because, although the site is hosted in the US, with free speech protection, articles which can be read and downloaded in Australia are considered to have been published in Australia.

Evers insisted in his blog that the site would never bow to censorship and that Aussie users would be able to see the site "up until the point that your God-forsaken government blocks it with their soon-to-be-implemented secret list of banned material".

The site was blacklisted by the Australian Communications and Media Authority during the trial of the country's censoring firewall.

The article on aborigines was also removed from Google's Australian search results earlier this year. As Joseph Evers put it in his blog: "This was right after Google had done a large amount of grandstanding about fighting Chinese censorship. Which proves they’re a bunch of spineless hypocrites."

One of the site's moderators gave a rather brilliant interview to Nine News which includes a quote from Matthew 15.11 - "Not that which goeth into the mouth defileth a man; but that which cometh out of the mouth, this defileth a man." Wise words indeed.

Evers has been advised by his lawyer to steer clear of Australia. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.