Feeds

Google fails to grab Nexus name

It's nothing new

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Google has demonstrated that it too can name a phone without waiting until it owns the name: its attempt to get Nexus One recognised as a trade mark has been rejected.

Google filed for a trademark on "Nexus One" in December, but the rejection of that filing was noted up by Why The Lucky - though an appeal is likely on the basis that Google has never, to our knowledge, been involved in the oil industry.

In December last year Google filed to have "Nexus One" registered with regard to "mobile phones", but the existing owner of the word "nexus"- one Integra Telecom - was awarded possession of the term with regard to a whole host of telecommunications services, including: "transmission of data and voice... conference calling, call forwarding, call rejection, call return, call waiting, caller ID, caller ID block... and high-speed access to a global computer network."

Which would seem comprehensive if it wasn't for the fact that Integra's ownership only relates to services offered "for participants in the physical oil industry"*.

No doubt Google's lawyers will be taking that up with the US Patent & Trademark office; the company has every right to appeal the decision and would appear to have decent grounds to do so.

Apple was less fortunate with the iPhone, which belonged to Cisco, though a private deal was negotiated. Microsoft was less fortunate back in 1998 when Redmond had to shell out $5 million to the original owner of "Internet Explorer".

Google is still fighting for the name Android too: the estate of Philip K. Dick reckon that running an OS called "Android" on a device called the "Nexus One" is treading on the toes of aspirational robots, and Google is still involved in claim and counterclaim from registrant Erich Specht. Mr. Specht's claim continues to be the subject of a civil action, but Google will be hoping Nexus One isn't so hard to get hold of. ®

* Update: It's been pointed out that we got that cock-eyed: seems the patent specifically excludes the oil industry. We're still trying to find out why, but in the meantime Google's lawyers will have to look elsewhere.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
You! AT&T! The only thing 'unlimited' about you is your CHEEK, growl feds
Man, we did everything but knock on their doors - carrier
The DRUGSTORES DON'T WORK, CVS makes IT WORSE ... for Apple Pay
Goog Wallet apparently also spurned in NFC lockdown
Watch out, Samsung and Apple: Xiaomi's No 3 in smartphones now
From obscurity to selling 19 million mobes a quarter
Brazil greenlights $200m internet cable to Europe in bid to outfox NSA
Only one problem: it won't make the slightest difference. And they know it
Wanna hop carriers with your iPad's Apple SIM? AVOID AT&T
Unless you want your network-swapping tech disabled for good, that is
Knocking Knox: Samsung DENIES vuln claims, says mysterious blogger is a JOKER
But YES, system does store encryption key on the device
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.