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Twitter bomb hoax man changes plea

Not guilty

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A UK man accused of posting a Twitter update that was taken as a threat to blow Doncaster airport "sky high" is to face trial, and has changed his plea to not guilty.

Paul Chambers, 26, allegedly posted the contentious update on 6 January, after a run of bad weather forced the Yorkshire airport to close a week before he was scheduled to fly to Ireland. The message came to the attention of managers at Doncaster's Robin Hood Airport, who called in the police.

Chambers, of the Balby area of Doncaster, was questioned by police and later charged with a single count of sending a threatening message. The 26-year-old initially pleaded guilty to these offences at an early hearing before Doncaster Magistrates' Court but changed his plea to not guilty at a hearing last Friday, the Press Association reports.

The case will now go forward to a trial, also at Doncaster Magistrates' Court, pencilled in for later this month.

Updates to Chamber's still very much active Twitter account can be found here. ®

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