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Harrods punts 3D TVs with free shutter specs

Posh peoples' shop out to outdo common-or-garden retailers

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Posh department store Harrods has dispute Currys claim to be the first UK retailer to begin taking advance orders for Sony 3D TVs.

Currys announced this past Friday it was taking orders in store there and then, and online from 4pm.

But Harrods' in-store Sony Centre began taking 3D TV orders on the same day too, and told Reg Hardware that punters have already signed up for sets.

Harrods' offering, like that of Currys, is the £2500 Bravia HX903. Currys, while taking orders now, won't ship the sets until "May/June", and we'd say that Harrods won't be any different.

Currys originally said it was pricing the set at £2999, but it has since reduced that to £2500.

Not that that's all you'll pay: glasses are extra - £100 a pair - and you'll also need a £75 transmitter to allow the TV to synchronise the specs' shutters with the left- and right-eye images.

However, Harrods said two pairs of 3D glasses will be provided with all the sets it sells. ®

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