Feeds

US National Broadband plan goes to Congress

Bigger, better, faster than anyone else, in theory

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

All Americans will be entitled to 4Mb/sec broadband, and America will have the fastest mobile network in the world, under the FCC's plan for the future of internet access.

The Federal Communications Commission today presented the plan to Congress. The rest of us will have to wait until tomorrow to get the details, though a summary posted by the FCC (pdf) reveals much that was expected and a few surprises.

We already knew that the FCC intends to find 500MHz of spectrum for auction to existing and aspiring network operators, and that the money raised will pay for the whole plan. We now know that 300MHz of that will become available over the next five years, though we're still not clear where it's all going to come from (though TV broadcasters will be in the firing line), or how the operators will raise the money to pay for it.

But the plan contains a commitment to ensuring America has the "fastest and most extensive wireless network of any nation", which will apparently come to exist thanks to the enormous amount of radio spectrum and some governmental investment in using it more efficiently.

Fixed broadband is going to be important too, with the FCC taking on the role of guaranteeing providers advertise their speeds accurately, and setting the pace by extending the Universal Service Fund to pay for every American to have 4Mb/sec "actual download speeds". The FCC reckons that will take a decade, but invites Congress to chuck in "a few billion dollars" to speed things up.

By 2020 the FCC wants to see 100 million US homes connected at a real speed of 50Mb/sec, every school, hospital and government building sporting 1Gb/sec of connectivity, and squads of Digital Literacy Corps (modelled on AmeriCorps) training everyone how to best make use of the internet.

Ideals are much easier to present than details, but we'll have to wait until tomorrow to get the latter. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
Apple Watch will CONQUER smartwatch world – analysts
After Applelocalypse, other wristputers will get stuck in
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.