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Twitter sensation follows Chief Twit's amazing claims

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Blabbertastic palmtop chunter-casting service Twitter* has received another massive hype injection from the BBC, which has published an interview - already causing a Twitter sensation - on how important Twitter is, given by Twitter's co-founder.

The Beeb managed to worm many important indiscretions out of Evan Williams.

"Our goal at Twitter is to be a force for good," the media exec eventually admitted, backed into a corner by relentless Paxman-style probing from the Beeb's Carrie Grace.

Williams also cracked under pressure and gave it as his opinion that Twitter was a terrifically positive factor in the world today as it offered the poor and downtrodden of the world a chance they wouldn't otherwise have to communicate. He was especially chuffed that White House press secretary Robert Gibbs - a man who in the normal course of events commands little attention from the mainstream media - uses Twitter.

"He's definitely using it as part of their strategy and supporting Obama ... So that seems important because it's really changing the game there," enthused the web-2.0 kingpin.

Before Twitter, it was of course almost impossible for the official viewpoint of the President of the United States to be heard.

Williams also suspects that Twitter may somehow force authoritarian regimes around the world to be nicer. The Beeb said he had told it that Twitter is "fundamental to democracy" - there was none until it appeared, in the Beeb's view of Williams' view.

But some evil regimes have responded unsportingly by blocking Twitter. Williams confessed that this has the spear of liberation baffled for now.

"We don't have any specific plans in China or other areas where we're blocked," he revealed.

But the co-inventor of democracy stood firm on one point - he and his firm aren't in this to make money or repay their investors. But they are wondering how on Earth they're going to keep the bills paid once their startup cash runs out.

"What we want to do is build something into the product that makes us money and makes the product better," he said, though he doesn't yet know exactly what that something should be.

"The real scalable business model is still in the works," he revealed.

We here at the Reg are also interested in adding something to our existing service which makes it better and causes money to flood in. We don't know what it is yet, but we're bound to think of something.

Get in on the ground floor while you can, by sending money directly to the editorial offices in London (not sales or accounts or any of that lot: it'll be our little secret). ®

*In case you have not read a newspaper, listened to the radio or looked at the interwebs for a few years, Twitter is the latest stage in the progression of web formats. It is essentially a type of personal website so easy to update that users are often tempted to do so even when they don't really need to.

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