Feeds

What's so bad about Samsung's Bada?

Samsung's iPhone pitch comes to life

The Power of One Infographic

Samsung has been showing its first Bada phone, able to download applications from Samsung's version of iTunes and nowhere else. But will Bada really challenge Apple and the iPhone?

That's clearly what Samsung has in mind - Bada is a closed platform owned and controlled by Samsung, and Bada applications have to be approved by the company and are all sold through the "Samsung Apps" store. Bada is supposed to enable smart-phone functionality at feature-phone prices, and the comes with a comprehensive development platform even if it's somewhat lacking in imagination.

Thw Samsung Wave

The ability to download new Bada apps is central to the Wave

The Wave is Samsung's first Bada-compatible handset - we don't know what the retail price will be but the specifications suggest that the feature phone price is still some way off unless Samsung decides to sell the Wave as a loss leader. The first Bada handset has a 3.3-inch-AMOLED screen with capacitive touch sensitivity, 2GB of RAM, 8GB storage and a 1GHz (snapdragon) processor - that's roughly what Microsoft is asking for its Windows Phone 7 Series handsets, so not really low-end territory.

But the Wave is intended to be the first of many Bada handsets, and Samsung is quick to point out that Bada will feature in "a significant" proportion of the 100 million touchscreen phones Samsung intends to shift in 2010 (having sold 40 million in 2009), so there should be a few customers prepared to buy Bada applications for the next couple of years at least.

Not that all Wave applications will have to be Bada - the handset also supports Java (MIDP 2.0), and there's some support for OMTP widgets though the extent isn't clear yet.

But we're interested in Bada development, which is done using C++ with the Bada SDK and associated Eclipse-based IDE, both of which can be downloaded from the Bada Developers' site.

Bada's approach to C++ is suitably modern: no multiple inheritance, except of interfaces, and no object properties - everything's fully encapsulated. The latter requirement might make porting applications onerous, but only if you've let your developers (or yourself) slip from best OO practice.

One thing at a time, unless you're Samsung

The Bada platform doesn't do multitasking, at least not between downloaded applications. Local applications (preinstalled) can multitask with one Bada application at a time, which means the developer has to deal with the whole background/foreground thing without the advantage of proper multitasking.

When an app pops to the front, or drops to the back, there's an event notification, but there's no mechanism for the application itself to request foreground status - you'll have to wait for the user to select your app through the task manager or by launching the app again.

Applications can be closed by the user hitting the End key, when another Bada application is launched, or if the underlying system thinks it's short of resources. But there's a decent notification system along with mechanisms for application-state storage and retrieval.

Once an application is running it can access the usual range of libraries: containers, panels, menus, etc. and including OpenGL ES for 3D graphics. Functions for embedding Adobe Flash content in an application are also available, but most interesting is the range of "Social" APIs.

The Power of One Infographic

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
Microsoft unsheathes cheap Android-killer: Behold, the Lumia 530
Say it with us: I'm King of the Landfill-ill-ill-ill
All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on
Radio professor tells us how wireless will get faster in the real world
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup
Just hook us up to more 10Gbps ports, backbone biz yells in tit-for-tat spat
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.