Feeds

9TB in 20 minutes? Sign me up!

IBM hails 'breakthrough' algorithm

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

In an experiment IBM researchers used the fourth most powerful supercomputer in the world - a Blue Gene/P system at the Forschungszentrum Julich in Germany - to validate nine terabytes of data in less than 20 minutes, without compromising accuracy. Ordinarily, using the same system, this would take more than a day. Additionally, the process used just one percent of the energy that would typically be required.

In a press release last week, IBM hailed a "breakthrough method based on a mathematical algorithm that reduces the computational complexity, costs, and energy usage for analyzing the quality of massive amounts of data by two orders of magnitude. This new method will greatly help enterprises extract and use the data more quickly and efficiently to develop more accurate and predictive models."

OK, I’m a sucker for anything that does something a lot faster – even if I don’t quite understand how it does it.

So I have to write a least a little bit about the paper that three IBM researchers submitted documenting their technique and results. I was faced with a blizzard of phrases such as “Inverse covariance matrices,” “Matrix factorizations,” “Cubit cost,” and this helpful explanation: “First, we turned to stochastic estimation of the diagonal.”

These terms, plus many others that I also don’t understand, are in just the abstract; the body of the paper seems considerably more technical and complex.

The one phrase that I fully understood was: “We stress that the techniques presented in this work are quite general and applicable to several other important applications.” And this is an important phrase, because it means that using this technique (and others that smart guys are working on right now), we’ll be able to see orders of magnitude improvement in other analytic tasks that use vast amounts of data. It’s always good to see progress.

In case you’re interested, here are some pictures of the guys who came up with it – mostly shots of them standing around looking smarter than any of us.

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.