Feeds

Big Phone's first Google Android defaults to...Yahoo!

Yahoo! goes where Ballmer fears to tread

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The first Google Android-based handset offered by the iPhone-hugging AT&T will not use Google as the default search engine. It will use Yahoo!.

As reported by BusinessWeek, the Android-based Motorola Backflip will debut on March 7, and its browser search box will default to Yahoo!, although users will have the option of switching to Google.

Yahoo! has an existing relationship with AT&T - aka Big Phone, the second largest carrier in the US and the only US provider offering the Apple iPhone - and the two outfits have some sort of deal in place to give Yahoo!'s search engine prime placement.

"We have a long-standing relationship with AT&T and more than 80 carrier partnerships around the world for our award- winning mobile-search experience,” Yahoo! vice president David Katz told BusinessWeek. “Mobile search continues to be a focus for investment and innovation.” Yahoo! and AT&T were not immediately available for comment.

On Tuesday, during a conference keynote in Silicon Valley, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer played down the possibility of Redmond inking deals to give its Bing search engine prime placement on Android phones. "That's a little more complicated," he said. "Android without [Google] isn't Android. We're going to have to see where the Android market develops."

But clearly, Yahoo! and AT&T see things differently. Android is a (semi-) open source operating system, which means that handset makers can use its code without the approval of Google - and without making licensing payments to the Mountain View Chocolate Factory.

Unlike Nexus One - which is sold from Mountain View's new online store - the Backflip is not a Google-branded phone.

Microsoft has inked a search deal of its own with Verzion, the largest US carrier, to make Bing the default on certain BlackBerry phones. Google search is the default on the iPhone. But that could change. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.