Feeds

Oracle buys into Sun's 'Project Copy Linux' dream

Former Sun exec lowers red flags

Intelligent flash storage arrays

A former Sun Microsystems' executive has re-assured worried OpenSolaris users the open-source operating system has a future under new owner Oracle.

Dan Roberts, Oracle director of product management, has said the database giant will continue to invest in OpenSolaris and will deliver the operating system's next incarnation: OpenSolaris 2010.03.

"Oracle will continue to make OpenSolaris available as open source, and Oracle will continue to actively support and participate in the community," Roberts told the annual OpenSolaris meeting Friday on IRC.

Roberts repeated the official party line coming from Oracle when it's asked about plans for the Sun hardware and software products that Oracle has decided to keep.

"Oracle is investing more in Solaris than Sun did prior to the acquisition," he said. Roberts added Oracle "will continue to contribute technologies to OpenSolaris, as Oracle already does for many other open source projects."

But a former director of Solaris, OpenSolaris, and database marketing said certain features would be kept out of the community pool.

Roberts significantly flagged up how some of the enterprise features found in MySQL under Sun were not returned to the community. "There may be some things we choose not to open source going forward, similar to how MySQL manages certain value add at the top of the stack," he said.

"It's important to understand the plan now is to deliver value again out of our IP investment, while at the same time measuring that with continuing to deliver."

The comments on OpenSolaris follow growing concern among members of the OpenSolaris community that their product had gone almost unmentioned during Oracle's recent Sun-strategy outing, and that - despite reaching out to Oracle - they'd had heard nothing back.

OpenSolaris project manager Peter Tribble complained they'd been completely ignored," with their questions over the project's future going unanswered. OpenSolaris developer and evangelist Ben Rockwood also wrote an open letter pleading for information.

But Tribble now seems satisfied. The project manager blogged here: "While there are clearly devils in the details - it's clear than Oracle plan to keep pushing OpenSolaris forward, so rumors of its death have been greatly exaggerated." ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.