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Apple accuses HTC of iPhone tech theft

Lawsuit launched

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Apple has begun legal proceedings against HTC, alleging the Taiwanese phone manufacturer has used iPhone technology without its say-so.

The Mac maker claimed HTC has infringed almost two dozen of its patents, all touching on the iPhone's UI, underlying software architecture and the hardware design.

Apple filed a complaint about the matter with the Delaware US District Court - known for its reputation for taking a dim view of patent infringement if successfully proven - and the US International Trade Commission (ITC).

Getting the ITC on the case is widely seen by litigious companies as a way of accelerating the judgement process. If the ITC adjudicates in Apple's favour, it can seek a ban on the import of HTC handsets, and the iPhone maker's case is considerably strengthened in the court case. Generally, the ITC takes less time to rule on such a case than the US court system does.

Apple is already engaged in legal combat with Nokia - both firms claim each nicked the other's phone technology - and Kodak. ®

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