Feeds

SCO's Linux litigation architect angles for SCO's mobile biz

Former CEO strikes back

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

Desperate to fund its seemingly-endless legal battle for Unix copyrights against Novell and others, SCO Group has found someone willing to buy the bankrupt company's mobile assets - and it's none other than Darl McBride, the former SCO chief executive sacked as a result of his ruinous crusade to claim Unix.

Groklaw has flagged up that SCO's Chapter 11 trustee, Edward Cahn has proposed to punt the shell-of-a-company's mobility biz to Mobility Inc. Holdings (MIH), a firm created by McBride for the sole purpose of buying the assets, for the chump change value of $35,000.

The sale of SCO's mobility business would include source code to HipCheck, a smartphone app for remote monitoring of Unix and Windows systems, and Shout mobile voice messaging tools. It also includes 12 servers, 13 domain names, and 10 developer smartphones. MIH's down payment would be $5,000, with the remaining paid upon closing.

According to court documents, the terms do provide for MIH to pony up a maximum of $60,000 in "income participation" payments to SCO in the (extremely unlikely) event that revenues generated from the mobility business reach over $1m in a year.

The filing states that after McBride offered to buy the mobility group, SCO's trustee group compiled a list of 12 "targets" that might also have an interest in buying the biz. It said that over a two-week period, the group attempted to email or telephone ("or both") the targets, except for one that could not be reached.

In the end, none of the targets indicated real interest in purchasing the SCO's mobility wing. As Groklaw astutely points out - the trustee group will likely to have spent more than $35k on the billable hours just for pitching and concluding the sale.

A potential alternative source of cash for SCO Group arrived in early February, with an offer from majority shareholder Ralph Yarro to lend the company more than $2m for its pending legal cases. It would seem that one way or another, SCO will cling to life to see its Unix lawsuit through to the end. ®

Website security in corporate America

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s
The iKing thinks telly is far too fiddly and ugly – basically, iTunes
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.