Feeds

Large Hadron Collider briefly back on over weekend

Halting start to 2010 proton billiards season

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), mightiest particle-masher ever assembled by the human race, briefly circulated its first hadron beams of 2010 at the weekend. However the vast machine has now been shut down again to remedy further technical snags.

Following last week's unfortunate multi-magnet quench incident, which saw large sections of the LHC's 27km forcefield conduit blink offline just as boffins were about to start powering particles around it, a new redline was painted on the dials in the control room. It had been hoped that beams would fire up on Friday, but in the event there was no success until the early hours of Sunday morning.

Even as the world's media noted that beams were back up, however, a "cryo intervention" was declared and beaming ceased. As this report is written, the LHC's subterranean tunnel circuit is cleared for people to enter (nobody is allowed down there when beams are up - access doors have retina-scan locks, and "it has to be a live eyeball", according to our control-room sources).

The latest estimates say that the rectification and recovery to supercold operating temperatures is expected to take until 5 or 6 o'clock this evening Swiss time.

It looks as though it may be a while before the Collider team can get the insanely complex machine back up to the record-breaking collision intensities seen late last year - and then onward to the planned 7 Tera-electron-Volt matter-mangling expected later this year. The LHC was designed to be capable of firing two even more outrageous 7 TeV beams into each other for an ultimate collision energy of 14 TeV, but following previous superfluid explosion disasters engineers now consider that a major refit will be required before such power levels are safe. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run
Still in one piece, but we're going to need MORE POWER
TRIANGULAR orbits will help Rosetta to get up close with Comet 67P
Probe will be just 10km from Space Duck in October
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
CRR-CRRRK, beep, beep: Mars space truck backs out of slippery sand trap
Curiosity finds new drilling target after course correction
China to test recoverable moon orbiter
I'll have some rocks and a moon cheese pizza please, home delivery
What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this
Sorry, Harvard, did you say kilobots or KILLER BOTS?
NASA's rock'n'roll shock: ROLLING STONE FOUND ON MARS
No sign of Ziggy Stardust and his band
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Vulture 2 spaceplane autopilot brain surgery a total success
LOHAN slips into some sexy bespoke mission parameters
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.