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Adobe squishes code execution bug in download manager

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Adobe Systems on Tuesday patched a critical vulnerability that could be exploited to remotely install malicious files on end-user PCs when they install or upgrade Reader and Flash applications.

When combined with a flaw on Adobe's website, the bug in the Adobe Download Manager made it possible for attackers to install malware on Windows machines simply by leading victims to a special link on the adobe.com domain. Last week, researcher Aviv Raff demonstrated how the vulnerabilities could be exploited to download and execute any file of his choosing on a Register test machine.

The download manager is invoked when people download Flash or Reader from Adobe's website. It typically is removed as soon as a computer is restarted.

Those who have used the download manager in the past can verify they are no longer vulnerable by ensuring that the C:\Program Files\NOS\ folder, and all its contents are no longer present. Users should also make sure the "getPlus Helper" Windows service isn't present by typing "services.msc" (without the quotation marks) at a command prompt.

Adobe has more details here. ®

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