Feeds

Zmanda hooks Tivoli cop into MySQL

Open source backup glue

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Open source vendor Zmanda is adding hooks into its MySQL database backup software for shops using IBM's Tivoli Storage Manager to mastermind the policies.

The company on Monday unfurled a new feature for Zmanda Recovery Manager called — get ready for some unwieldily precision here —Tivoli Storage Manager Option for Zmanda Recovery Manager for MySQL.

Let's parse that out: Zmanda Recovery Manger (ZRM) is a Perl-based utility that does backup and recovery of live MySQL databases to on-premise storage or Amazon's S3 cloud service.

Zmanda's new ZRM-TSM option lets users have their MySQL data protection policies managed by Tivoli Storage Manager.

"If an IBM shop running Tivoli management software wants to integrate MySQL into their infrastructure, that has not been very easy because Tivoli doesn't support MySQL," Zmanda's CEO, Chander Kant, explains to El Reg. "We are filling that gap."

Kant told us that the Tivoli option comes after nine months of development and testing at the behest of its customers — in particular, one key retailer (who he couldnbame) that essentially funded the software's creation by paying for an early version of the product. TRM-TSM also earned the "Ready for IBM Tivoli" software validation seal over at Big Blue.

The option lets admins schedule full and incremental backups of MySQL, based on system resources and backup policies using either the schedule for TSM or ZRM. It supports all MySQL Storage Engines, including InnoDB and MyISAM, according to Zmanda.

Kant said he expects the typical ZRM-TSM will be mid-sized to enterprise shops getting their feet wet with web applications.

"Organizations who are running IBM hardware and software for their data center operations are now bringing quote unquote enterprise 2.0-style applications inside the data center, which are typical powered by MySQL," he said.

Kant added that after tackling Zmanda's Tivoli-control option, the company is next considering making similar ties to Symantec or HP Data Center.

ZRM-TSM requires a subscription for ZRM server (ranging from $300 to $750 per MySQL server annually). Adding the option itself to ZRM 3.1 costs $1000 per Tivoli server annually for standard support or $1500 for premium. A subscription comparison chart is viewable here. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?