Feeds

Tricorder/Aliens-motion-tracker handscanner kit gets $6m

3D air-bongo mouse shark tech in DARPA cashgasm

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Roguish Pentagon kill-nerds have decided to spend more than $6m on a miraculous handheld scanner along the lines of a Star Trek Tricorder or Aliens Colonial Marine motion-tracker. The through-walls people detector will work in the same way as the mysterious brain-slime electrofield senses of sharks and manta rays.

The motion tracker as favoured by the US Colonial Marines. Sees through ceilings too.

Now we just need a gizmo that foreshadows the dramatic necessity for us to die one by one.

The new technology has been dubbed E-FED, or Electric Field Detector, by those behind it. The idea would be to detect the bioelectrical fields produced by all living things using sensitive electronics. This would offer detection and tracking through walls or other barriers, and allows a sensor to easily work in three dimensions.

Such methods are already employed in real life, by elasmobranches (sharks and rays). Slime-filled canals in the creatures' heads - known as the "ampullae of Lorenzini" - let them sniff out the electric field of bottom-feeding flatfish concealed in mud or sand, leading to a tasty treat for the prowling elasmobranch.

Other applications of electrofield detection have already been made by human technology, perhaps most famously by the eccentric researchers of MIT's Media Lab. They have proposed (and built prototypes of) so-called "Taufish" or "Lazyfish" devices. These can detect a human hand situated above a sensor, allowing a "3D mouse" gesture based computer interface.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
LONG ARM of the SAUR: Brachially gifted dino bone conundrum solved
Deinocheirus mirificus was a bit of a knuckle dragger
MARS NEEDS WOMEN, claims NASA pseudo 'naut: They eat less
'Some might find this idea offensive' boffin admits
No sail: NASA spikes Sunjammer
'Solar sail' demonstrator project binned
Carry On Cosmonaut: Willful Child is a poor taste Star Trek parody
Cringeworthy, crude and crass jokes abound in Steven Erikson’s sci-fi debut
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.