Feeds

Engineers sweat Oracle's Sun-Java integration promise

The Devil inside JRockit and HotSpot

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Oracle's top brass might have committed to merging its Java technology with that of Sun Microsystems but the specifics are still being worked out.

The plan on how to merge Oracle's JRockit Java Virtual Machine (JVM) and Sun's HotSpot JVM is "still evolving", Oracle principal engineer Mark Reinhold has said.

Leads from two JVM's engineering teams are "spending lots of quality time together" Reinhold told an Oracle Technology Network webcast audience, but he admitted "it's not an easy problem taking the best of each [JVM] and figuring out the long-term convergence."

Reinhold, formerly of Sun, speculated that integration of the two to produce a single JVM probably wouldn't happen soon but might finally take place in the next year-and-a-half to two years.

The goal to integrate of JRockit and HotSpot was announced by Oracle as part of its strategy day in January, where managers laid our the plan for Sun's middleware and operating systems in the wake of Oracle's successful closure of its $5.6bn acquisition of Sun.

Oracle did not provide a timeframe for the JVMs' merger.

By planning to merge the two, Oracle's management has set engineers from Oracle and the former Sun the Darwinian task of picking the best features and dumping the rest.

What's unclear is whether that means keeping most of one application server and building in the best from the loser or building a new application server that combines both.

Reinhold noted Oracle is renowned for being willing to set aside its own technologies should it come across something better. It kept the former BEA's JRockit at the expense of its own Java application server, after all. "It's pretty clear, Oracle both engineering-wise and management-wise is committed to figuring out what the best is," he said.

Speaking personally, Reinhold said one option might be for a merged VM with the JRockit garbage collector and surfacabilty along with the HotSpot runtime compiler. Reinhold reckoned JRockit has enviable mission control - management - systems, while there was room for improvement on the server compiler, which HotSpot could provide.

You can see the full webcast here.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Sway: Microsoft's new Office app doesn't have an Undo function
Content aggregation, meet the workplace ... oh
Sign off my IT project or I’ll PHONE your MUM
Honestly, it’s a piece of piss
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
NetWare sales revive in China thanks to that man Snowden
If it ain't Microsoft, it's in fashion behind the Great Firewall
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.