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Sony intros 10x optical zoom compact

DSC-H55 unveiled

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Here's Sony's new Cyber-shot DSC-H55, a chunkier snapper than the slimline TX5 also announced today.

The H55's key statistics: a 14.1Mp sensor - it's a 7.76mm Super HAD CCD, Sony says - mounted behind one of the company's own "premium" G lenses and a 10x optical zoom mechanism.

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H55

Sony's Cyber-shot DSC-H55: 10x optical zoom

The camera provides image stabilisation through the optics, but it also has an active shake-reduction system that kicks in when it's being used to shoot video - 720p and 30f/s, since you ask.

The H55 measures 103 x 58 x 29mm and packs in a battery good for 310 shots, Sony claimed. It uses SDHC and Memory Stick for storage, but it comes with 45MB to start you off. There's a 3in LCD on the back.

Sony highlighted the H55's Sweep Panorama mode, which snaps a sequence of shots while you pan around and them stitches them together into one.

Again, Sony kept mum on the H55's price, but it did say the camera will be out at the end of March. ®

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