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Updated Legalized SlingPlayer 3G TV joins App Store ranks

'No, we didn't' vs. 'Yes, we did'

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MWC As expected, a 3G-enabled version of Sling Media's TV player for the iPhone has found its place among the 150,000-or-so apps in Apple's App Store.

On Monday at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Sling Media announced the availability of the 3G SlingPlayer Mobile - a mere week and a half after AT&T gave its go-ahead for that app's access to its beleaguered 3G network.

With the updated app, slingers who own a Slingbox Solo, Pro, or Pro-HD and an iPhone will now be able to have TV content slung to them over the mobile airwaves, just as they could over Wi-Fi until AT&T and Apple gave their blessing to the update, version 1.2.

3G had a long and bumpy ride to the SlingPlayer Mobile. As we reported last June, AT&T initially didn't allow Sling Media access to its 3G network, citing bandwidth congestion. At that time, however, AT&T had no problem with Major League Baseball jumping aboard.

Then last week, Big Phone had a change of heart. In a statement at that time, AT&T's Mobility and Consumer chief Ralph de la Vega said that Sling Media had "made important changes to more efficiently use 3G network bandwidth and conserve wireless spectrum so that we were able to support the app on our 3G mobile broadband network."

Sling Media spokesperson John Santoro, however, told us differently, saying that there had only been "some very minor additions to the application over the one we submitted last spring."

But Sling Media general manager John Gilmore quickly took the AT&T line, telling Ars Technica: "We actually have been working very intensively with AT&T to get the 3G streaming approved."

Whatever. As in most cases involving official company statements, the truth is undoubtedly floating around somewhere in the cracks between stories.

In any case, the app is now available. Depending upon where you live, SlingPlayer Mobile will set you back $29.99, £17.99, or €23.99. ®

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