Feeds

Google co-founder: Maybe we'll stay in China after all

Brin Preaches to the unconverted

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

A month after storming the moral high-ground over China's hacking activities, Sergey Brin has declared the firm is happy to get off its high horse and kick its heels in the country a little longer.

Google co-founder Sergey Brin told the TED conference last week he hopes the search giant can sort out its differences with China, in order that Google.cn can continue operating in that region.

“I want to find a way to work within the Chinese system to bring information to the people,” said Brin, in an interview at the annual TED conference last Friday in Long Beach, California.

“Perhaps we won’t succeed immediately, but maybe in a year or two.”

Brin's comment, reported by the New York Times and elsewhere, was his first public statement about the hacking attacks that hit the company late last year. Since when Google has threatened to withdraw its search engine biz from the People's Republic.

In January Google outed the December attacks that hit 34 corporate firms, by saying they originated in China. Mountain View threatened to leave the country if it couldn't reach an agreement with the Chinese government to stop censoring results on its local search engine.

According to Google, "a primary goal" of the the attackers was to access the email accounts of Chinese human rights activists. Google said at the time that attacks on two Gmail accounts were largely unsuccessful, but that a subsequent investigation showed that the accounts of dozens of activists in the US, China, and Europe "have been routinely accessed by third parties."

However, Chinese government officials have given no signals that they intend to come to any agreement with Google and back down from censoring or blocking certain websites in the country.

On Friday Brin took a swipe at the other corporations that were caught up in the December hack attacks.

“If other companies were to come forward, I think we’d all be safer,” he said.

Brin also claimed that Google's missionary-like presence in the Chinese search market had forced its rivals - presumably Baidu and chums - to cut back on censorship of websites in China. ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM
Internet of Stuff securo-cockups strike yet again
'Speargun' program is fantasy, says cable operator
We just might notice if you cut our cables
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo! caught in malvertising mess
Cisco says 'Kyle and Stan' attack is spreading through compromised ad networks
Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers
Step One: try default passwords. Step Two: Repeat Step One until success
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
Microsoft to patch ASP.NET mess even if you don't
We know what's good for you, because we made the mess says Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.