Feeds

Opera auditions for iPhone browser spot

Much better for one-handed operation

Security for virtualized datacentres

Opera Software will be demonstrating its eponymous browser on Apple's iPhone next week, but don't expect to see it popping up in iTunes any time soon.

The announcement comes ahead of Mobile World Congress, the industry's annual shindig in Barcelona, where Opera Software will be demonstrating Opera Mini running on an iPhone to show it's faster than Safari. It will be hoping to force Apple into accepting the alternative browser of choice into iTunes.

Opera Mini is the Java-based version of Opera Mobile, offering greater handset compatibility with less integration than is possible using a native application. The iPhone doesn't support Java, so this will be a native application with the Mini feature set - though differences between the two are minimal these days.

Safari does a decent job rendering the internet on an iPhone - putting it side-by-side with Opera Mobile shows two very credible options. Opera is better for one-handed operation: making a better stab at guessing the ideal zoom level for reading, but Opera lacks the infinite zoom of the iPhone, so it's swings and roundabouts.

Opera's big sell is the "turbo" feature, which caches and compresses content at Opera's servers to reduce bandwidth and increase download speeds. We've liked Turbo before, but the iPhone's Safari browser is pretty impressive too. Putting the two side by side, we find Opera Turbo shaving off a second or two in loading times. This is not enough to make a huge difference to the browsing experience, unless one was working over a very slow connection.

Not that Apple is likely to allow Opera's browser onto its baby. Opera Software won't even be submitting the iPhone version for approval prior to showing it to journalists next week, clearly in the hope of embarrassing Apple into approving something Cupertino has made it very clear wouldn't be allowed.

Apple thinks an alternative browser would confuse users, just as an alternative e-mail or music download client would, and they're probably right. iPhone users don't want choice, they want simplicity, and Apple will continue to provide that for them no matter what the Norwegians show journalists next week. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.