Feeds

IPS's double IT has risks, says commissioner

Doing a good job nevertheless, he controversially adds

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

Identity commissioner Sir Joseph Pilling has expressed concerns about the Identity and Passport Service's two-stage approach to its core technology.

"The IPS have gone for what they call a tactical and a strategic solution to the IT demands of running an ID scheme in this country," he told the Security Document World conference in London on 8 February 2010. One system has been put in place for the small-scale launch of the scheme, but another will be introduced when it is expanded by forcing passport applicants to enrol.

"I am not sure whether if you have two schemes in short order you double, treble or quadruple the risk or even more than that, but I am pretty clear that it is a quite ambitious approach to take, and I am particularly intending to take an interest in the transition from the tactical to the strategic," said Sir Joseph.

Having seen the identity card enrolment process first hand, he added he was not satisfied that all the best possible standards are being applied and that he intended to keep his attention focused on this.

However, Sir Joseph said that IPS is doing a good job in looking after data. "It is not one of those bodies in the public or private sector who have shoved millions of unencrypted records out into the public domain, unintentionally, carelessly or as the victim of some malevolent member of staff or consultant," he said.

He said he will take a detached view of the scheme: "My emphasis is independence, independence and independence. But I am not only independent of the government, I am also independent of the opposition, whether they become the next government in a few weeks time or not."

He reminded his audience of security specialists that after a general election, it could be that the UK will no longer have identity cards for British nationals. The Conservatives have pledged to scrap the scheme.

Kable's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.