Feeds

Oracle issues emergency security patch for WebLogic

'Full disclosure' yields results

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Oracle issued an emergency patch for its WebLogic Server almost two weeks after a white-hat hacker disclosed a vulnerability that allows criminals to remotely execute commands on the webserver with no authentication necessary.

The vulnerability in the Node Manager component of Oracle WebLogic Server can be exploited by carrying out commands over a network without requiring a username and password, Oracle warned late last week. The company went through the unusual step of issuing a patch outside its normal update cycle.

The out-of-band release came 12 days after Evgeny Legerov, CEO of Russian security firm Intevydis, disclosed a WebLogic vulnerability that sounded almost identical to the one described in the Oracle advisory. Legerov recently blogged his intention to do away with so-called "responsible disclosure" practices, in which researchers privately notify software makers about bugs in their products to prevent criminals from exploiting the defects before they're fixed.

Intevydis was dispensing with the practice "because it is enforced by vendors and it allows vendors to exploit security researches to do QA work for free," he wrote.

The vulnerability carries a Common Vulnerability Scoring System severity score of 10 on Windows versions 9.0 and later of WebLogic. Versions for non-Windows operating systems, by contrast, carry a rating 7.5.

Oracle's advisory strongly recommended users apply the emergency patch, along with a cumulative WebLogic patch issued in January.

"This vulnerability may be remotely exploitable without authentication, i.e. it may be exploited over a network without the need for a username and password," Oracle warned. "A knowledgeable and malicious remote user can exploit this vulnerability which can result in impacting the availability, integrity and confidentiality of the targeted system." ®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
DARPA-derived secure microkernel goes open source tomorrow
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.