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Gov tempts young London onto ID database with booze, 'games'

Doesn't sound at all dodgy, does it

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London's yoof can now follow in the footsteps of their Mancunian counterparts and sign up for the government's ID card scheme.

Youngsters between the ages of 16 and 24 are being tempted into the scheme - and therefore onto the National Identity Register - with the prospect of being able to buy "alcohol, computer games and DVDs, going to the cinema or to a club."

Not to mention that other tempting offer - being able to travel to Europe.

Not surprisingly, the anti-ID card lobby is up in arms, pointing out that the government appears to be banking on the booze-fuddled, computer game-addled kids not consulting the small print of the ID card legislation.

NO2ID said that there was little mention of the fact that signing up for the £30 card imposes a lifetime obligation to keep the National ID Register up to date on your life.

Phil Booth, National Coordinator of NO2ID, said: "What's on offer here is a system that will keep track of your personal details for official purposes for life - and perhaps long after you have died of old age."

The BBC identified Peter Fawcett, 21, as the first (non-foreign) person to get a National Identity Card in London.

Fawcett apparently told The Politics Show London: "I'd looked at other ways of getting identity cards, getting a provisional licence, that's more expensive and really this is the cheapest option for me.

"I can put this identity card in my wallet, which is really good. If you lose your passport it is so much more expensive to replace."

Presumably Peter doesn't ever anticipate driving.

Let's hope the same applies to the other youngsters the government is likely to tempt onto its scheme. The streets of London are dangerous enough without having to dodge hordes of hopped-up games playing youngsters trying to drive to Europe. ®

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